Services, repads, customisations & restorations

Services & repads

About the repairers

For the last 25 years Wood, Wind & Reed has been offering woodwind & brass repairs to all levels of players from students to professionals.



Daniel Bangham began the business making reproduction clarinets, many of which are still used in period performances today. The business has expanded to now include the repair of all woodwind, and some brass instruments, and also many specialist alterations and customizations are undertaken. Daniel continues to repair when time allows, although he now has to spend a large majority of his time managing the retail business.



Tim Taylor Tim has had the opportunity to study professional oboe repair at the Buffet factory in Mantes Le Ville Paris.



Wood, Wind & Reed employs two further repairers: Brian Dent has worked with Daniel since the first workshop was opened and sets up all of the new instrument stock, bringing them from the basic factory set up to the high level of performance that we expect from all of our instruments. Steve Clark is an established repairer who has been with Wood, Wind & Reed since the making business expanded into repair and can be found in the main workshop working on any manner of woodwind or brass instruments.



Remember that all new instruments bought from Wood, Wind & Reed have a one year warranty. Please contact Brian Dent to arrange a suitable time for your instruments free first year check over or at any time during the first year of ownership if you have any questions or problems regarding your instrument.

COMMON SMALL REPAIRS

Broken or loose tenon corks

The cork around each joint of the clarinet is known as the tenon cork. If this becomes loose or damaged it would need to be replaced.

Replacing a broken spring

The thin pieces of wire and flat pieces of steel under each key are the springs. If these break they will need to be replaced.

Skim tight tenons (free on instruments purchased from Wood, Wind & Reed)

It is not uncommon for the joints on wooden instruments to become tight over time. This is the natural shifting of the wood due to heat and moisture. When this occurs a fine amount of the wood around the tenon needs to be removed to allow the joints to be put together smoothly once more.

Replacing a single traditional pad only

Replacing a single leather pad only

Move the thumb rest

If the thumb rest on the clarinet is not in a comfortable position it can be relocated and the old holes from where it was screwed on filled to leave the instrument blemish free.

Fit adjustable thumb rest

There are several different styles of thumb rest available which offer the freedom to adjust the thumb rest position without having to see a repairer.

Fit Kooiman thumb rest

This is a plastic thumb rest ergonomically designed to shift the weight of the instrument away from the end of the thumb closer to the joint to the hand. This is designed to help those players who suffer from strain injuries in the hands due to the weight of the instrument.

GOOD WORKING ORDERS, SERVICES AND REPADS

Good Working Order

A "good working order" is a repair to maintain an instrument in good playing condition. This type of repair would generally entail checking all pads but only replacing those that are totally beyond use. Pads which are worn and still sealing when played with a moderate finger pressure are left in place. Corks and felts are replaced if totally worn. The body and key work is not cleaned. The aim of this repair is to keep an instrument operational at a good standard at the lowest sensible cost, whilst not fixing every small point on the instrument. Should Wood, Wind & Reed believe a larger repair is necessary they will advise the customer.

Service

A full service is the term used when an instrument is to be brought back to excellent condition but which is not so bad that it needs a repad. A full service would usually involve completely stripping down the instrument and cleaning all key work and body parts. Replacing any pads that are too worn to be re-seated or are unlikely to last a further six months playing, and replacing any tenon, crook, head or key corks as required. Key wear and dents are removed as discussed with the customer.

Repad

A repad would be carried out if the instrument is too worn to benefit from a full service. This form of repair would usually bring an instrument back to as-new playing condition. Repadding generally involves completely stripping down the instrument and cleaning all key work and body parts. Replacing all pads with new ones and replacing any tenon, crook, head or key corks that are unlikely to last a further six months playing. Thorough regulation of the instrument upon reassembly and careful balancing of all springs. Key wear and dents are removed as discussed with the customer.

There are a wide number of pad options available for the repair of clarinets each offering a different feel to the instrument. Where applicable we will discuss with the customer as to which type of pad would be most suitable for their instrument. We also keep in stock some manufacturers' pad sets for specific instruments such as Selmer bass clarinets. Where applicable these will be used for the repair.

Premium pads

A high quality traditional pad used on all repairs unless otherwise stated.

Leather pads

These pads offer longer durability and are slightly softer than traditional clarinet pads.

Gortex pads

These are fitted as standard to some professional instruments. Offering the same immediate response as a premium traditional pad but with the Gortex layer making a stronger and longer lasting pad surface area.

COMMON SMALL REPAIRS

Replace crook cork (Cor anglais only)

The cork around the crook where the crook fits on to the instrument is known as the crook cork. If this becomes loose or damaged it would need to be replaced.

Broken or loose tenon corks

The cork around each joint of the oboe and cor anglais is known as the tenon cork. If this becomes loose or damaged it would need to be replaced.

Skim tight tenons (free on instruments purchased from Wood, Wind & Reed)

It is not uncommon for the joints on wooden instruments to become tight over time. This is the natural shifting of the wood due to heat and moisture. When this occurs a fine amount of the wood around the tenon needs to be removed to allow the joints to be put together smoothly once more.

Replacing a broken spring

The thin pieces of wire and flat pieces of steel under each key are the springs. If these break they will need to be replaced.

Replacing a single Octave Pad Only

Replacing a single traditional Pad Only

Replacing a single Cork Pad Only

Move the thumb rest

If the thumb rest on the clarinet is not in a comfortable position it can be relocated and the old holes from where it was affixed filled to leave the instrument blemish free.

Fit adjustable thumb rest

There are several different styles of thumb rest available which offer the freedom to adjust the thumb rest position without having to see a repairer.

Fit Kooiman thumb rest

This is a plastic thumb rest ergonomically designed to shift the weight of the instrument away from the end of the thumb closer to the joint to the hand. This is designed to help those players who suffer from strain injuries in the hands due to the weight of the instrument.

Sharpen Reed Knife

GOOD WORKING ORDERS, SERVICES AND REPADS

Good Working Order

A "good working order" is a repair to maintain an instrument in good playing condition. This type of repair would generally entail checking all pads but only replacing those that are totally beyond use. Pads which are worn and still sealing when played with a moderate finger pressure are left in place. Corks and felts are replaced if totally worn. The body and key work is not cleaned. The aim of this repair is to keep an instrument operational at a good standard at the lowest sensible cost, whilst not fixing every small point on the instrument. Should Wood, Wind & Reed believe a larger repair is necessary they will advise the customer.

Service

A full service is the term used when an instrument is to be brought back to excellent condition but which is not so bad that it needs a repad. A full service would usually involve completely stripping down the instrument and cleaning all key work and body parts. Replacing any pads that are too worn to be re-seated or are unlikely to last a further six months playing, and replacing any tenon, crook, head or key corks as required. Key wear and dents are removed as discussed with the customer.

Repad

A repad would be carried out if the instrument is too worn to benefit from a full service. This form of repair would usually bring an instrument back to as-new playing condition. Repadding generally involves completely stripping down the instrument and cleaning all key work and body parts. Replacing all pads with new ones and replacing any tenon, crook, head or key corks that are unlikely to last a further six months playing. Thorough regulation of the instrument upon reassembly and careful balancing of all springs. Key wear and dents are removed as discussed with the customer.

All instruments are repaired using either traditional high quality pads of felt, cork, or gortex. We will replace pads using the same material as currently on the instrument unless otherwise stated.

Premium pads

A high quality traditional pad used on all repairs unless otherwise stated.

Cork pads

A high quality cork pad used on all levels of instruments for the octave keys. Cork pads provide a firm playing surface and are often used in the repair of professional oboes. Where cork pads are currently being used on an instrument these will always be replaced with cork unless otherwise stated.

COMMON SMALL REPAIRS

Replace crook cork

The cork around the crook where it fits into the instrument is known as the crook cork. If this becomes loose or damaged it would need to be replaced.

Broken or loose tenon corks

The cork around each joint of the bassoon is known as the tenon cork. If this becomes loose or damaged it would need to be replaced.

Replacing a broken spring

The thin pieces of wire and flat pieces of steel under each key are the springs. If these break they will need to be replaced.

Replacing a single Leather Pad

Binding through rods

There are rods running through the centre of the body on the butt joint of a bassoon known as the through rods, these close a key on one side of the bassoon whilst you press another. The through rods can be made from glass, steel, plastic or wood. Over time the wood of the body of the bassoon can move and tighten around the through rods where they pass through the body making the keys feel sluggish. It is a relatively simple repair for the holes to be opened up very slightly to allow the rods to run smoothly again.

GOOD WORKING ORDERS, SERVICES AND REPADS

Good Working Order

A "good working order" is a repair to maintain an instrument in good playing condition. This type of repair would generally entail checking all pads but only replacing those that are totally beyond use. Pads which are worn and still sealing when played with a moderate finger pressure are left in place. Corks and felts are replaced if totally worn. The body and key work is not cleaned. The aim of this repair is to keep an instrument operational at a good standard at the lowest sensible cost, whilst not fixing every small point on the instrument. Should Wood, Wind & Reed believe a larger repair is necessary they will advise the customer.

Service

A full service is the term used when an instrument is to be brought back to excellent condition but which is not so bad that it needs a repad. A full service would usually involve completely stripping down the instrument and cleaning all key work and body parts. Replacing any pads that are too worn to be re-seated or are unlikely to last a further six months playing, and replacing any tenon, crook, head or key corks as required. Key wear and dents are removed as discussed with the customer.

Repad

A repad would be carried out if the instrument is too worn to benefit from a full service. This form of repair would usually bring an instrument back to as-new playing condition. Repadding generally involves completely stripping down the instrument and cleaning all key work and body parts. Replacing all pads with new ones and replacing any tenon, crook, head or key corks that are unlikely to last a further six months playing. Thorough regulation of the instrument upon reassembly and careful balancing of all springs. Key wear and dents are removed as discussed with the customer.

High quality white leather pads are used on all bassoon repairs. Where possible we use the manufacturer's own pad sets. We commonly keep Schreiber and Adler pad sets in stock.

COMMON SMALL REPAIRS

Replace crook cork

The cork around the crook where the mouthpiece fits on to the instrument is known as the crook cork. If this becomes loose or damaged it would need to be replaced.

Replacing a broken spring

The thin pieces of wire and flat pieces of steel under each key are the springs. If these break they will need to be replaced. Replacing a single leather pad only

Expand or shrink the crook tenon

If the crook twists in the instrument once the neck screw has been tightened then it can be expanded to make a more secure fit. The crook can also become too tight for the instrument; this may be a sign that it has been bent out of shape slightly and needs to be re-aligned.

Replace Missing Pearl

GOOD WORKING ORDERS, SERVICES AND REPADS

Good Working Order

A "good working order" is a repair to maintain an instrument in good playing condition. This type of repair would generally entail checking all pads but only replacing those that are totally beyond use. Pads which are worn and still sealing when played with a moderate finger pressure are left in place. Corks and felts are replaced if totally worn. The body and key work is not cleaned. The aim of this repair is to keep an instrument operational at a good standard at the lowest sensible cost, whilst not fixing every small point on the instrument. Should Wood, Wind & Reed believe a larger repair is necessary they will advise the customer.

Service

A full service is the term used when an instrument is to be brought back to excellent condition but which is not so bad that it needs a repad. A full service would usually involve completely stripping down the instrument and cleaning all key work and body parts. Replacing any pads that are too worn to be re-seated or are unlikely to last a further six months playing, and replacing any tenon, crook, head or key corks as required. Key wear and dents are removed as discussed with the customer.

Repad

A repad would be carried out if the instrument is too worn to benefit from a full service. This form of repair would usually bring an instrument back to as-new playing condition. Repadding generally involves completely stripping down the instrument and cleaning all key work and body parts. Replacing all pads with new ones and replacing any tenon, crook, head or key corks that are unlikely to last a further six months playing. Thorough regulation of the instrument upon reassembly and careful balancing of all springs. Key wear and dents are removed as discussed with the customer.

All saxophones are repaired using high quality leather pads. Where possible professional instruments are repaired using the manufacturers own pad sets designed specifically for each instrument. We commonly keep in stock pad sets for Selmer, Yanagisawa, Keilwerth, Conn and Buescher (snap on) saxophones. Please do not hesitate to contact us if you would like to discuss the availability of specific pads for your saxophone.

COMMON SMALL REPAIRS

Remove stuck mouthpiece

Remove stuck tuning slides

The tuning slides on any brass instrument can become stuck if they are not moved regularly. Stuck slides can be avoided if the slide is checked to see if it is moving every two weeks and grease applied if it feels stiff.

Replace Missing Pearl

Re-string valve

Solder one stay

Fit a ducks foot (French horns only)

A ducks foot is a form of adjustable hand rest that is soldered onto the french horn above the left hand. The paddle or foot of the rest sits on top of the left hand between the thumb and forefinger so putting the weight of the instrument onto the left hand rather than taking all the weight on the little finger.

SERVICES

A service on a brass instrument would involve stripping all slides and valves from the instrument, replacing valve felts, stops and strings where necessary, removal of easily accessible dents as discussed with the customer, thorough cleaning of the slides, valves and body of the instrument upon reassembly. We will be happy to give a quote for the removal of dents and straightening of slides upon inspection of the instrument.

COMMON SMALL REPAIRS

Replacement head cork

There is a cork in the head joint of your flute and piccolo just above the embrasure hole. If this becomes loose or moves out of position it will cause difficulty when playing and will put the instrument out of tune.

Replacing a broken spring

The thin pieces of wire and flat pieces of steel under each key are the springs. If these break they will need to be replaced.

Wobbly or loose joints

Over time the joints on a flute can become loose due to wear or mishandling. Depending upon the cause of the problem the time and cost of these repairs varies.

Tight joints

If the joints on your flute are becoming tight to fit together it is worth asking a repairer to take a look at the instrument. You should never need to use any form of grease to make the joints fit together. It can simply be a case of the sockets and tenons on the instrument needing a clean with a silver cloth. (Never use any form of liquid polish on a flute) If this does not help then there may be some underlying damage that needs to be looked at.

Broken or loose tenon corks (Piccolo only)

The cork around the top of the piccolo where the head joint goes on is known as the tenon cork. If this becomes loose or damaged it would need to be replaced.

Replacing a single small traditional pad only (C/Trill)

Replacing a single large traditional pad only

GOOD WORKING ORDERS, SERVICES AND REPADS

Good Working Order

A "good working order" is a repair to maintain an instrument in good playing condition. This type of repair would generally entail checking all pads but only replacing those that are totally beyond use. Pads which are worn and still sealing when played with a moderate finger pressure are left in place. Corks and felts are replaced if totally worn. The body and key work is not cleaned.
The aim of this repair is to keep an instrument operational at a good standard at the lowest sensible cost, whilst not fixing every small point on the instrument. Should Wood, Wind & Reed believe a larger repair is necessary they will advise the customer.

Service

A full service is the term used when an instrument is to be brought back to excellent condition but which is not so bad that it needs a repad. A full service would usually involve completely stripping down the instrument and cleaning all key work and body parts. Replacing any pads that are too worn to be re-seated or are unlikely to last a further six months playing, and replacing any tenon, crook, head or key corks as required. Key wear and dents are removed as discussed with the customer.

Repad

A repad would be carried out if the instrument is too worn to benefit from a full service. This form of repair would usually bring an instrument back to as-new playing condition. Repadding generally involves completely stripping down the instrument and cleaning all key work and body parts. Replacing all pads with new ones and replacing any tenon, crook, head or key corks that are unlikely to last a further six months playing. Thorough regulation of the instrument upon reassembly and careful balancing of all springs. Key wear and dents are removed as discussed with the customer.

Flutes have a wide range of pad types available to be put in them, each offering a different feel to the instrument. Where applicable we will discuss with the customer as to which type of pad would be most suitable for their instrument.

Premium Deluxe Pads

A high quality traditional flute pad used on all repairs unless otherwise stated. These pads consist of a card backing, layer of felt and double layer of bladder over all.

Red Sound Pads

Red sound pads are our recommendation for all professional flute repairs. The pads consist of a synthetic layer behind a thin layer of felt with a double layer of bladder over all. This creates a very stable pad which provides a firm immediate playing action. We prefer Red sound pads over other professional pad designs since they do not require making any alterations to the instrument upon fitting such as topping of the tone holes.

Muramatsu Alu Pad

These are designed for and available for Muramatsu flutes and come fitted to all modern Muramatsu instruments. Each pad consists of an alloy shell around the back, sides and centre of the pad, a thin layer of synthetic material, a thin layer of felt and a double layer of bladder over all. Each pad then sits upon a solid alloy washer within the pad cup giving it added stability. These again offer a very firm surface and more immediate response along with long-term stability.



Customisations & restorations

Wood, Wind & Reed has over the years carried out many alterations to instruments to suit each individual customers needs. Some of the more common alterations are the alteration of key work to allow for easier fingering, fitting extra stays to keys and crooks that have a tendency to get bent, adding regulation screws to saxophone palm keys, and fitting bass clarinet and bassoon spikes.

We have also customized slings and harnesses to move the weight of the instrument away from the hand and wrist. To discuss any alterations or customizations please do not hesitate to contact the shop.

Educational & bulk contract repairs

Wood, Wind & Reed are happy to arrange a visit by a qualified instrument repairer to your school or college, to assess your woodwind and brass instruments.

There is a flat rate charge of £90 per visit. This covers the thorough check over of up to 20 woodwind and brass instruments (if you have more than 20 instruments, £6.72 per additional instrument will be charged). Minor repairs or small adjustments needed to bring the instrument up to playing condition will be carried out at the time, at no extra cost.

For those instruments assessed as needing more in depth repairs (such as pad or cork replacement, bent key work and dent removal, up to full services and repads), a written quote will be provided. These repairs will be carried out at Wood, Wind & Reed's premises at a mutually convenient date.

Please note that we are only available to make on site visits on Mondays and within East Anglia.

Simiot & Grenser reproduction clarinets

Daniel began his career making high quality reproduction Simiot and Grenser clarinets which are still widely used and sought after in the music industry today. If you would like to have your Daniel Bangham clarinet serviced by the maker then please contact Daniel at the shop.

Repair Terminology

WOODWIND

  • Tone Hole: The hole through the body of the instrument that a key or finger closes over.
  • Key Touch: The part of a key you push with your finger.
  • Key/Pad Cup: The part of the key that holds the pad and closes over the tone hole.
  • Pad: Made of leather, felt or cork sits inside the pad cup and seals the tone hole.
  • Spring: The thin pieces of wire and flat pieces of steel under each key.
  • Re-seat a pad: Adjusting a pad currently on an instrument to allow it to close evenly and securely once more.

BRASS

  • Valve: The part of a brass instrument that moves when the touch piece is pressed.
  • Touch Piece: The part of a piston or rotor valve that you push with your finger.
  • Tuning Slide: The parts of the instrument tubing that can be moved in and out to effect the tuning.
  • Lead Pipe: The part of an instrument that your mouthpiece goes into.